Women Are More Susceptible to Health Effects of Smoking

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Women are more susceptible to the health effects of smoking.  Women who smoke may develop severe lung disease at younger ages with lower amounts of smoking.  That’s according to a new study.  Researchers in Norway compared 954 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder to 295 control subjects.  They found that women with COPD were, on average, younger than men who had smoked for fewer years suggesting that women may experience lung damage with overall lower levels of smoking.

 

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Study Shows Even Light Smoking Carries Serious Risks

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If you’re a person who smokes casually, maybe you light up a cigarette a few times a day in social settings, you probably think it’s safe, but you may want to look at it again.  That’s according to a Norwegian study of 43,000 men and women.  They found that smoking fewer than five cigarettes a day, commonly known as light smoking, triples the risk of dying of heart disease or lung cancer in men.  In women, the increased risk of lung cancer was five times greater.  Researchers looked at a 32 year period.  This is not a small study and it shows the concerns we must look into.  

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Mentally Quitting Smoking

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There is no doubt that it is tough to kick the habit when it comes to cigarette smoking. If you ask 100 people how they stopped, the odds are quite strong you will get 100 different answers. But there is usually one consistent comment that comes across. It goes something like this. ‘I was so frustrated with smoking that I finally said, ‘The heck with it. I’m quitting.” It is clear that to finally stop smoking, a person needs to take a mental order to do it. It doesn’t matter whether it’s the latest drugs, acupuncture, or whatever. You have to want to.

 

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Low-Tar Cigarettes May Be Linked to a Certain Form of Lung Cancer

Low-Tar Cigarettes May Be Linked to a Certain Form of Lung Cancer

The news that there may have been changes in the way certain cigarettes are formulated, and the suggestion that this could affect lung disease, is downright frightening. According to a University of California researcher, up to 50% of our nation’s lung cancer cases could be due to this. The research is ongoing, but the thought is that a form of lung cancer called adenocarcinoma may be linked to so-called low-tar cigarettes that have chemicals called nitrosamines. Adenocarcinoma attacks small air sacs far deeper in the lungs. The theory is that people who smoke low-tar cigarettes need to breathe in deeper.

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Research on Genes and Cigarette Addiction

Research on Genes and Cigarette Addiction

It could become one of the major developments of genetic research. Duke researchers believe that as many as 221 different gene variants play a role in cigarette addiction and the ability to quit. Researchers from Duke and the National Institute of Drug Abuse hope this may someday lead to a new tool for tailoring smoking cessation treatments to a patient’s individual genetic makeup. Researchers admit it isn’t entirely this simple. Certainly, the environment plays a role, but knowing how to manipulate or alter genes could be crucial.

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Depressed Adults Are Likely to Also Be Smokers

Depressed Adults Are Likely to Also Be Smokers

More than 40% of U.S. adults who have depression are also smokers, meaning people need help with both if they want to quit. According to a U.S. Government survey published, it says that more than half of middle-aged men with depression were also smokers, while half of women under 40 who were depressed also smoked. About 7% of U.S. adults had depression in the years 2005 through 2012. Globally, tobacco kills about 5 million people a year and according to the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s a big deal. On average, smokers die 13 to 14 years earlier than non-smokers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says cigarette smoking is responsible for about one in five deaths annually, or about 440,000 deaths per year.

We always appreciate your comments and suggestions. For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Women Are More Susceptible To Health Effects Of Smoking

Women Are More Susceptible To Health Effects Of Smoking

Women are more susceptible to the health effects of smoking. Women who smoke may develop severe lung disease at younger ages with lower amounts of smoking. That’s according to a new study. Researchers in Norway compared 954 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder to 295 control subjects. They found that women with COPD were, on average, younger than men who had smoked for fewer years suggesting that women may experience lung damage with overall lower levels of smoking.

We always appreciate your comments and suggestions. For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.