Osteoporosis Is Not Just A Women’s Disease

Osteoporosis Is Not Just A Women’s Disease

When we hear osteoporosis, we usually picture a postmenopausal woman. But 2-million American men have osteoporosis, and another 12-million are at risk. According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, in men over age 50, the risk of osteoporosis is greater than the risk of prostate cancer. Around age 70, men, like women, experience a precipitous drop in hormone levels, creating a similar risk profile for fragility fractures. Yet many clinicians don’t counsel men about osteoporosis or screen them for risk factors. And most elderly men have no idea they are at risk for osteoporosis and disabling osteoporotic fractures.

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Vitamin D, Calcium and Breast Cancer Risk

Vitamin D, Calcium and Breast Cancer Risk

We know that vitamin D and calcium help fight osteoporosis in women. But now there is news from a major Harvard Medical School study that women who get a lot of vitamin D and calcium throughout their lives may cut the risk of breast cancer by almost third. The study looked at data for more than 10,500 premenopausal women and 21,000 postmenopausal women; they were 45 and older. These women were part of the Women’s Health Study. The study in humans supports prior studies in animals that found an association between calcium and vitamin D and breast cancer.

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Physically Active Teens Experience Bone Building Benefits

Physically Active Teens Experience Bone Building Benefits

There is yet another good reason to begin exercising early in life and participating in sports activities as a teenager. According to research from the University of Sweden, men who participated in athletics in their late teens experience bone building benefits that last for years, even if they’re no longer training intensively. Most people know that brittle bone disease, or osteoporosis, occurs in women, but it also happens in men. In fact, some experts predict the incidence is expected to triple over the next 50 years. Physical activity is known to help build bone mineral density. That’s also called BMD. That reduces the likelihood of fractures in later life. Researchers followed 90 men, 63 athletes and 27 non-athletes controls. The participants were followed for eight years beginning in their teens. By the end of the study, those who were active as teens had greater bone density, even if they had stopped training years earlier.

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