Study of Cholesterol and Memory

memory

Yet another study looking at the importance of monitoring cholesterol and keeping it at the proper levels.  Cholesterol is important to monitor and to look at and evaluate. According to a report from the journal of the American Heart Association, people who have lower levels of HDL, the good cholesterol, have a higher risk for memory problems than those with higher levels of HDL.  The information was based on a study of 3,700 adults.  The scientists tested the participants 15 to 17 years ago and then a second time between 2002 and 2004.  They found that those whose HDL levels went down between the two tests had a 61% higher risk for memory problems than those with high HDL levels.  This is not an all or nothing study, but it shows that there’s a relationship.  We’re learning more and more about the link between high cholesterol, heart disease and vascular problems, and dementia.  Clearly, it’s something that we cannot ignore.  We have to look at it, understand it, and learn more as time goes on.   

 

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Exercise and Mental Stimulation Can Improve Memory

senior exercise

Your computer has plenty of memory. Now, a Mayo Clinic study suggests you too may as well if you combine moderate exercise and mental stimulation such as computer use. In the study, people over 70 who engaged in both types of activity had less cognitive decline than those who took part in either exercise or mental stimulation alone. “A sound mind is a sound body” is a statement that’s been around for years, and essentially what this is saying is the truth. Exercise is important as well as diet and also mental stimulation.

 

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Smoking May Affect Memory

Smoking May Affect Memory

People who smoke during mid-life may be more likely than non-smokers to have a poor memory. Researchers analyzed the smoking habits and memory and cognitive test results of over 5,000 civil servants in London, England, aged 35 to 55. Those who were smokers had a higher risk of death than those who never smoked. In addition, current smokers were more likely to have memory deficiencies than non-smokers, even age-adjusted for sex, socioeconomic status, or other health behaviors. Those who were ex-smokers were also 30% less likely than current smokers to have vocabulary and language score problems.

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Napping Linked to Improved Memory and Learning

Napping Linked to Improved Memory and Learning

There is a classic German study you need to bring up to your boss at work. The research finds that if people took a nap, it could make a major difference in productivity. The study showed that if you napped for just six minutes during the day, it will not only make you feel better, but it can improve your ability to learn and remember. The connection between sleep and learning is something that researchers have only recently pinpointed, but many know from their own experience, such as the mathematician who says he’s going to sleep and then has that eureka moment or he thinks of that math equation.

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The Brain Needs Sleep

The Brain Needs Sleep

There are some days that start off with the feeling, “I can’t wait until I go back to sleep.” For some reason, largely unrelated to the amount of sleep we get, we seem to crave more time; we want shut-eye. Researchers have studied this phenomenon and say there is far more to sleep than actual catch-up of sleeping hours. Our brains need the down time as well. Our brains also need time to process memories. They are studying this using functional MRIs. The results are fascinating and clearly there is more to sleep than meets the eye.

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Study of Cholesterol and Memory

Study of Cholesterol and Memory

Yet another study looking at the importance of monitoring cholesterol and keeping it at the proper levels. Cholesterol is important to monitor and to look at and evaluate. According to a report from the journal of the American Heart Association, people who have lower levels of HDL, the good cholesterol, have a higher risk for memory problems than those with higher levels of HDL. The information was based on a study of 3,700 adults. The scientists tested the participants 10 to 12 years ago and then a second time between 2002 and 2004. They found that those whose HDL levels went down between the two tests had a 61% higher risk for memory problems than those with high HDL levels. This is not an all or nothing study, but it shows that there’s a relationship. We’re learning more and more about the link between high cholesterol, heart disease and vascular problems, and dementia. Clearly, it’s something that we cannot ignore. We have to look at it, understand it, and learn more as time goes on.

We always appreciate your comments.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

A Look at Alzheimer’s Disease

A Look at Alzheimer’s Disease

The statistics are quite dramatic. It’s estimated that 4.5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and there are some who estimate the number could be as high as 6.5 million. One of the difficult things about Alzheimer’s is that it has a gradual onset and may not be apparent for 5-to- 15 years. The signs and symptoms in the earlier stages are very vague, but as time goes on symptoms include problems with memory, communication, and a progressive decline in memory overall. Many people think there is no cure for Alzheimer’s so why get tested or have a diagnosis made? But it is important to realize there are many other causes of memory problems and mental decline. Things like depression or altered chemical balances in the body can lead to change. In addition, there are medicines that can slow the decline. If you have concerns or are concerned about a family member, take the time to see your doctor.

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For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.