Study of Cholesterol and Memory

memory

Yet another study looking at the importance of monitoring cholesterol and keeping it at the proper levels.  Cholesterol is important to monitor and to look at and evaluate. According to a report from the journal of the American Heart Association, people who have lower levels of HDL, the good cholesterol, have a higher risk for memory problems than those with higher levels of HDL.  The information was based on a study of 3,700 adults.  The scientists tested the participants 15 to 17 years ago and then a second time between 2002 and 2004.  They found that those whose HDL levels went down between the two tests had a 61% higher risk for memory problems than those with high HDL levels.  This is not an all or nothing study, but it shows that there’s a relationship.  We’re learning more and more about the link between high cholesterol, heart disease and vascular problems, and dementia.  Clearly, it’s something that we cannot ignore.  We have to look at it, understand it, and learn more as time goes on.   

 

For more information, please go to www.123MyMD.com.   

Cholesterol Measurement and Heart Disease

Cholesterol Measurement and Heart Disease

There is no doubt that heart disease is a known killer and we have been aware that controlling cholesterol is a major way to reduce the chances of problems, but cholesterol is not the only way we measure these things. At the very minimum, doctors order a lipid panel which includes studies like LDL, or bad cholesterol, triglyceride, and HDL, or good cholesterol. If necessary, we can break it down more. All of this is because as we have studied the relationship between cholesterol and heart disease, we have found there is more to watch than a simple test. You may or may not need many of these specific tests based on your own past medical history and family history, but it can make a difference. It’s very important that you understand that cholesterol measurement, and the various fractionated areas of cholesterol, are important to look into because they can help provide a window into your overall health.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

The High Cost of Heart Disease Drugs

The High Cost of Heart Disease Drugs

Covering the full cost of heart disease prevention medications, such as statin cholesterol-lowering drugs and drugs to reduce high blood pressure, could save individuals $2,500 and society $1 billion in medical costs. Researchers used a math model to estimate the savings. About 50% of patients don’t take all their drugs. The cost is part of the reason why, so doctors estimate that giving the drugs free of charge would increase the number of people who take them. That could lower heart attack, stroke, and death.

We always appreciate your comments and suggestions. For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Long-Distance Walking Results in Successful Weight Loss in Cardiac Rehab Patients

Long-Distance Walking Results in Successful Weight Loss in Cardiac Rehab Patients

Daily long-distance walking results in twice as much weight loss as standard cardiac rehabilitation exercises that involve walking short distances at a brisk pace. That’s what a new report from the journal Circulation and the University of Vermont College of Medicine finds. They studied 71 overweight patients in cardiac rehab who were randomly assigned to standard rehab exercises that burned 700 to 800 calories per week or intensive rehab exercises involving long walks that burned 3,000 to 3,500 calories a week. After five months, the group walking 45 to 60 minutes a day most days a week had greater improvements in 10 risk factors including blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and cardio-respiratory fitness. They all also lost 18 pounds compared to 8 pounds in the control group. It really shows the importance of getting out there and walking.

We always appreciate your comments.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Study of Cholesterol and Memory

Study of Cholesterol and Memory

Yet another study looking at the importance of monitoring cholesterol and keeping it at the proper levels. Cholesterol is important to monitor and to look at and evaluate. According to a report from the journal of the American Heart Association, people who have lower levels of HDL, the good cholesterol, have a higher risk for memory problems than those with higher levels of HDL. The information was based on a study of 3,700 adults. The scientists tested the participants 10 to 12 years ago and then a second time between 2002 and 2004. They found that those whose HDL levels went down between the two tests had a 61% higher risk for memory problems than those with high HDL levels. This is not an all or nothing study, but it shows that there’s a relationship. We’re learning more and more about the link between high cholesterol, heart disease and vascular problems, and dementia. Clearly, it’s something that we cannot ignore. We have to look at it, understand it, and learn more as time goes on.

We always appreciate your comments.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Pluses and Minuses of Three-In-One Pills

Pluses and Minuses of Three-In-One Pills

They are called three-in-one pills. There’s a growing theory that we should have pills to help control cholesterol, blood sugar, high blood pressure, and there’s many people who are trying to find out ways to have one pill do everything. Now there are positive sides to this. It will help people try to be compliant, in other words, to take their drugs. But the downside is that many of these medications would be so complex that if something was going wrong it would be hard to figure out what aspect of the medication was causing it.

We always appreciate your comments.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

NFL Players Have Similar Heart Risk Profiles as Men in the General Population

NFL Players Have Similar Heart Risk Profiles as Men in the General Population

Despite their large size, NFL players have similar heart risk factors to men in the general population. A study of 500 football players in the National Football League finds that they have heart risk profiles similar to men in the general population despite their overall bigger size and heavier weight. The football players were compared to men in the same age group, 23 to 35 years old. Overall, the football players had lower levels of fasting blood sugar, 6.5% versus 15.5%, but a greater rate of high blood pressure, 13.8% to 5.5%. Cholesterol levels were about the same for both groups, however, the football players were much less likely to smoke, 0.1% versus 30.5%. Researchers say the physical activity of the football players likely does much to offset the risks they might have from weight and size.

We always appreciate your comments.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.