Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

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Eating more chocolate is associated with higher depression scores.  Researchers assessed the mood of 931 participants who were not taking antidepressants using a standard depression scale.  They then correlated the results from those with a food survey.  Those who scored very highly, reflecting probable major depression, reported consuming more than twice as much chocolate as those who were negative for depression.  The findings were similar between women and men.  The researchers speculate that depression may stimulate cravings for chocolate as a form of self-medication.  Animal studies suggest that chocolate may have positive mood benefits, however, they cannot rule out the possibility that chocolate actually contributes to the depressed mood, or that both cravings and depressed mood are caused by a third, underlying factor.  The report is in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

 

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Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

Eating more chocolate is associated with higher depression scores. Researchers assessed the mood of 931 participants who were not taking antidepressants using a standard depression scale. They then correlated the results from those with a food survey. Those who scored very highly, reflecting probable major depression, reported consuming more than twice as much chocolate as those who were negative for depression. The findings were similar between women and men. The researchers speculate that depression may stimulate cravings for chocolate as a form of self-medication. Animal studies suggest that chocolate may have positive mood benefits, however, they cannot rule out the possibility that chocolate actually contributes to the depressed mood, or that both cravings and depressed mood are caused by a third, underlying factor. The report is in the Archive of Internal Medicine.

We always appreciate your comments and suggestions. For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

Eating more chocolate is associated with higher depression scores. Researchers assessed the mood of 931 participants who were not taking antidepressants using a standard depression scale. They then correlated the results from those with a food survey. Those who scored very highly, reflecting probable major depression, reported consuming more than twice as much chocolate as those who were negative for depression. The findings were similar between women and men. The researchers speculate that depression may stimulate cravings for chocolate as a form of self-medication. Animal studies suggest that chocolate may have positive mood benefits, however, they cannot rule out the possibility that chocolate actually contributes to the depressed mood, or that both cravings and depressed mood are caused by a third, underlying factor. The report is in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

We always appreciate your comments and suggestions. For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Does Dark Chocolate Protect the Heart?

Does Dark Chocolate Protect the Heart?

Does dark chocolate help protect the heart, and if it does, why? There have been numerous reports looking at this. A new study out of Yale has some very interesting findings. According to the researchers, dark chocolate may also boost the function of vital endothelial cells that line the inside of blood vessels. Cocoa is rich in a group of antioxidant compounds called flavonoids which are also found in fruits and vegetables, wine, and green tea. It is the flavonoids which protect the heart.

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Chocolate May Reduce Blood Pressure and Heart Disease Risk

Chocolate May Reduce Blood Pressure and Heart Disease Risk

Chocolate may reduce blood pressure and heart disease risk. Research has been done on 19,000 people. They looked at them for 10 years and found that those who reported eating an average of one small square of chocolate a day, that’s a quarter of an ounce, had lower blood pressure and a 39% lower risk of having a heart attack or stroke. The researchers concluded that chocolate, particularly dark chocolate, may help prevent heart disease, but only if it replaces other snacks so that one’s weight does not increase. Because this wasn’t an interventional study, it’s impossible to say for certain if it was chocolate and not something else that they had in common that reduced the risk. We think the big point here, though, is chocolate doesn’t necessarily have to be the curse that some people make it to be. Chocolate could have protective effects, in some cases.

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For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

Eating More Chocolate Is Associated with Higher Depression Scores

Chocolate and Depression Eating more chocolate is associated with higher depression scores. Researchers assessed the mood of 931 participants who were not taking antidepressants using a standard depression scale. They then correlated the results from those with a food survey. Those who scored very highly, reflecting probable major depression, reported consuming more than twice as much chocolate as those who were negative for depression. The findings were similar between women and men. The researchers speculate that depression may stimulate cravings for chocolate as a form of self-medication. Animal studies suggest that chocolate may have positive mood benefits, however, they cannot rule out the possibility that chocolate actually contributes to the depressed mood, or that both cravings and depressed mood are caused by a third, underlying factor. The report is in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

We appreciate your comments.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.