Long-Distance Walking Results in Successful Weight Loss in Cardiac Rehab Patients

Long-Distance Walking Results in Successful Weight Loss in Cardiac Rehab Patients

Daily long-distance walking results in twice as much weight loss as standard cardiac rehabilitation exercises that involve walking short distances at a brisk pace. That’s what a new report from the journal Circulation and the University of Vermont College of Medicine finds. They studied 71 overweight patients in cardiac rehab who were randomly assigned to standard rehab exercises that burned 700 to 800 calories per week or intensive rehab exercises involving long walks that burned 3,000 to 3,500 calories a week. After five months, the group walking 45 to 60 minutes a day most days a week had greater improvements in 10 risk factors including blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and cardio-respiratory fitness. They all also lost 18 pounds compared to 8 pounds in the control group. It really shows the importance of getting out there and walking.

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The ACE Cough

The ACE Cough

It happens so often, it has a name. It’s called the ACE cough. The ACE cough is actually a problem where people take anti-hypertensives, or blood pressure medications, called the ACE antagonists. These Angiotensin Converting Enzyme antagonists actually have one big side effect. They can cause people to get a staccato cough, in a way where they repeat it over and over again. If you’re on a blood pressure medication and have that cough, you should check it out with your doctor. You may have the ACE cough.

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Chocolate May Reduce Blood Pressure and Heart Disease Risk

Chocolate May Reduce Blood Pressure and Heart Disease Risk

Chocolate may reduce blood pressure and heart disease risk. Research has been done on 19,000 people. They looked at them for 10 years and found that those who reported eating an average of one small square of chocolate a day, that’s a quarter of an ounce, had lower blood pressure and a 39% lower risk of having a heart attack or stroke. The researchers concluded that chocolate, particularly dark chocolate, may help prevent heart disease, but only if it replaces other snacks so that one’s weight does not increase. Because this wasn’t an interventional study, it’s impossible to say for certain if it was chocolate and not something else that they had in common that reduced the risk. We think the big point here, though, is chocolate doesn’t necessarily have to be the curse that some people make it to be. Chocolate could have protective effects, in some cases.

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